Friday, October 06, 2017

I Need Water – 7 Things You Can Do in Dry Conditions

Fall is here and so too water can dry up - here are some reminders on what you can do when water is low on the trail -

It has been very dry all along the Appalachians in the Eastern US, prompting lots of worry in hiking circles about water availability for fall hikes. 
So what can you do to prepare or while on a backpacking trip?

1.       Try to schedule your hike when there has been rainfall. Easier said than done when you can only go at a certain time. But if you have flexibility, do it. Check in with hiking social media to get updates if possible. If need be, alter your hiking plans to a different area that has better water availability. Some areas are beginning to close due to fire danger. Check ahead of time for these issues before you leave.

2.       Take an updated guidebook that will tell you when sources are reliable or unreliable. For instance AWOL’s AT Guide for the Appalachian Trail tells you when source are reliable. And those not marked this way for me were dry. Also, you need guidebooks of potable sources in towns etc. On the heels of this, take a map or use a map app on your phone. Maps can identify water sources – esp. springs, streams, etc that may not be in your guidebook. Or it will let you know if a water source is flowing from a beaver pond or a field or a road, of which you then need to treat with care. It will also tell you where you might want to camp that night.

3.       Take extra water containers. When in a dry section, you may need to tote water for a considerable distance. Take extra Platypus containers, empty water bottles, etc. Adjust your pack weight and how you carry items in your pack to adjust for the extra water (a liter of water weighs about 2 lbs). 

4.       When you see a water source, fill up. Hydrate too. Check your map, if it has been very dry, you may need to err on the side of caution and take an extra few liters with you. Plan your mileage accordingly if you need to carry extra weight.

5.       Plan non cook meals. This will use less water.

      6. Make sure you have adequate water treatment (chemical, Sawyer squeeze, Steripen, Pump)









      7. If things get tough, don’t be afraid to ask a neighbor for water. Sometimes you need to do what’s safe. If all else fails and there is none, get off the trail. Better to be off and hike another day than get dehydrated or worse.

It can be tough trying plan for water conditions, esp. when there has been no rainfall. But with some planning and flexibility, you can make it through the driest of times.


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1 comment:

highdeserthiker said...

Lauralee,

Good information, I being a desert hiker can affirm the importance of water on the trail. Although it can be excess weight, it is so important.